Moving from Complication to Simplicity by Elaine Pendergrast

Like many of you, I can barely keep up with the demands of life: my job, a house with three cats, a social circle of long-time friends and neighbors, a large garden with chickens, bees, and a rabbit (okay, so most of you don’t have those), and my own health and well-being. It’s easy to feel overwhelmed and find myself standing in the kitchen with no idea of what to do first, as happened a few nights ago.

At times like that, I know I have to prioritize, but in order to do that, I need to be centered and clearheaded. To help me become more present and available, I turn to the tools that have helped me in so many circumstances, those that I gained from my study and practice of Breema. Continue reading “Moving from Complication to Simplicity by Elaine Pendergrast”

Including the Body in Psychotherapy Practice by Angela Porter

Doing graduate work at The Wright Institute allowed me to assimilate my life experience with my desire to become a clinician capable of navigating the increasingly complex mental health needs of our society. Before becoming a therapist, I was a substance abuse treatment counselor for many years, and I studied Gestalt and Body Psychotherapy as a work scholar at Esalen Institute, with some of the great pioneers in the field.

Mulching fallen trees after a storm at Esalen, I injured my back and was referred to the Breema Clinic in Oakland. My back healed, but there was more; I began to experience a sense of cohesiveness, presence, calmness, and clarity that I had never experienced before. Continue reading “Including the Body in Psychotherapy Practice by Angela Porter”

Breema: Parenting with the Nine Principles of Harmony by Eileen Sendrey and Alexandra Johnson

The practice of Breema offers support for intentional parenting by providing practical tools for being present in everyday activities and interactions by unifying body, mind, and feelings. This article provides background and examples for how using simple principles such as No Judgment, Firmness, and Gentleness, and No Hurry/No Pause in daily life offers a means for self-care in the midst of a hectic day. This can provide an invaluable tool for modeling positive behaviors for children and offers the potential to be nourished, rather than drained, by the events of daily life. Continue reading “Breema: Parenting with the Nine Principles of Harmony by Eileen Sendrey and Alexandra Johnson”

When the mind is connected to the body…

Our health is constantly affected by what we think. Like our clothing, our way of thinking covers our body and affects it. But our thoughts are based on self-interest, and when we live in the past and future, we never have a new thought. In order to become healthy, we need to have a healthy mind. When we are present, we can have new thoughts. This is possible only when the mind is connected to the body.

–from First You Have to Be by Jon Schreiber

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Breema-Körperarbeit Achtsamkeit und Präsenz in der Berührung by Pari Schneider & Klaus Pfeiffer

Wir möchten Sie zu Beginn des Artikels zu einer kurzen Übung einladen. Setzen Sie sich dafür aufrecht und in einer bequemen Haltung hin und legen Sie Ihre Hände auf ihre Oberschenkel. Ihre Ellbogen sind entspannt. Nehmen Sie ihren Atem wahr und auch ihr Gewicht, wie es vom Boden und vom Stuhl getragen wird. Dann streichen Sie mit Ihrer rechten Hand und ganzer Beteiligung dreimal sanft und zugleich bestimmt von ihrer linken Schulter über ihren Oberarm, Unterarm, ihre Hand und über die Finger aus. Wiederholen Sie das Streichen nun mit der linken Hand auf der anderen Körperseite und spüren Sie anschließend die Wirkung der Übung. Continue reading “Breema-Körperarbeit Achtsamkeit und Präsenz in der Berührung by Pari Schneider & Klaus Pfeiffer”

The more connected you become, the more vibrant your life becomes.

When you go into a forest, you see many, many trees growing, filled up with life. Where does all that life come from? Those trees are alive because sap is flowing through them. It’s the same with us. There is one energy. You have to be connected to it. The more connected you become, the more vibrant your life becomes. In that vibrancy, your mind functions with more intelligence, your feelings with more presence, and your body with more ability. If, through taste, you get to know this life energy, you gradually become connected to the Source that created it.

–from First You Have to Be by Jon Schreiber

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To move from war to peace, we need to learn the art of acceptance…

Stating it very simply, we are either at war or at peace in life. And in war, we lose. Even if it looks like we’ve won, we haven’t. In war, everyone loses.

We don’t know it, but we are at war with ourselves. We always wish to be something we’re not. We wish others to be different, to change according to our liking. We are at war with our food, critical of what we eat, or critical of ourselves for eating it. We are conditioned to always be at war.

To move from war to peace, we need to learn the art of acceptance. But acceptance is not a mental phenomenon—it can’t be learned from words, concepts, or philosophy. We learn it by experience—that’s the language of Breema.

–from First You Have to Be by Jon Schreiber

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Experiencing Body Comfortable in the Moment by Alexandra Johnson

I was walking with my daughter. She asked me a question, and I realized that instead of listening to her, I had been lost in thought. As support for being available, I registered my breath and my footsteps as we walked. When I saw the mind drifting, I came back to the body, in order to participate more fully in this moment. Continue reading “Experiencing Body Comfortable in the Moment by Alexandra Johnson”

Conscious energy can be received.

In the street, there’s constant noise from many cars going by. Those are like our thoughts—they’re from mass consciousness. When you stay with the process of inhalation and exhalation, the traffic thins out. At some point, it looks like there’s no traffic. That’s when the feelings join the mind and body. Conscious energy can be received. Begin by asking your mind to stay with the process of inhalation and exhalation. Start with three minutes a day, preferably in the morning. When you are ready, increase it to four minutes. The mind that’s free of thoughts, the mind that doesn’t live in the past and future, isn’t something you just have. You have to work for it.

–from First You Have to Be by Jon Schreiber

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