A Practical Approach to Advice in Parenting by Alexandra Johnson

My son came into my room the other night in a panic, after watching a movie about the state of the world. He asked me what he could do to help. I wished to answer him in a way that could support him to find strength and confidence within himself.

I realized that to help him develop his own sense of direction, and not just give him my agenda, I have to look at how and where I find guidance. I know that when I try to tackle the world all at once, I find myself exhausted and frustrated. But if I can remember the principle of Single Moment/Single Activity, then I have a chance to approach each activity with Full Participation. Instead of a looming forest of responsibility, I have the potential to prioritize and bring my full attention to each event of my life. Continue reading “A Practical Approach to Advice in Parenting by Alexandra Johnson”

Self-Care in Parenting By Alexandra Johnson

Learning to listen to yourself is an essential tool for parenting. This dimension of self-care is not often highlighted in parenting education. Considerations often focus on attending to kids, partners, and helping everyone function as a team. To truly be able to listen to others, however, and to create a cohesive family unit, you need to know where to begin. If you have the ability to start with yourself, then everything else has the potential to naturally fall into place.

As a parent, I see that if I am scattered and tense, odds are the rest of my household is also. When I see my surroundings have degenerated into chaos, it is a reminder for me to look at my own state. I can take a step back and remember the Breema Principle of No Force. I consider the irony—I am moments away from shouting at my children in order to get them to stop screaming. Continue reading “Self-Care in Parenting By Alexandra Johnson”

Mutual Support in Childbirth by Alexandra Johnson

As soon as I opened my first copy of Spiritual Midwifery, I knew I wanted to be a midwife. This was confirmed when, still in college, I saw my first deliveries, shadowing the physician who had delivered me. My plan was to be a homebirth midwife, but I was inspired by a dynamic OB, and decided to follow in her footsteps. I tried to bring the energy of the home birth into the hospital setting and would often take transfers from home and birth centers. It was a joy to maintain the atmosphere that the family desired for their birth, whether it was a multigenerational party or just nuclear family; whether using medications for pain relief or getting creative with dance, water, and songs. Continue reading “Mutual Support in Childbirth by Alexandra Johnson”