Self-Breema in Daily Life by Alexandra Johnson

As I was cleaning my house one afternoon, I began daydreaming about all the other places I would rather be. I saw that I was lost in my thoughts and wished to come out of the past and future, and into an experience of this moment. I decided to fold the laundry with Single Moment/Single Activity. I approached the activity as if I were doing a Self-Breema exercise. I stayed with my breath, experiencing the weight of the body sitting on the floor. I folded each piece of laundry with interest in how my body was stretching, leaning, and rocking. Continue reading “Self-Breema in Daily Life by Alexandra Johnson”

Be Where You Are by Mary Cuneo

Mary Cuneo practices Breema bodywork with a receptive client.

Translation available in Spanish

Recently, waiting for the traffic light to turn green, the urgent thought “better hurry up!” came, with its familiar twinges of anxiety. I spontaneously took an impression of myself as I sat there, trying to hurry while sitting still: mind, convinced I should be closer to my destination than I was, and that somehow I was wrong to be where I was and not somewhere else; feelings, afraid of being late, critical of myself; and body, generally constricted, breathing shallowly, pronounced tension in belly and shoulders.

Fortunately, the Breema principle of “No Hurry/No Pause”came to mind, inspiring me to do as I do when doing Self-Breema or giving someone a Breema session—get the mind to drop its concept (“I should be elsewhere at this time”) by asking it to take on the task of registering the presence of the body. I did that, was nurtured by it, and felt grateful to be alive. Continue reading “Be Where You Are by Mary Cuneo”

I Want to Be More Present in my Life by Eileen Sendrey

I want to be more present in my life;

I want to be more present with myself;

I want to be more present with my family and friends;

I want to be more present at work or school.

What does that mean? How do I do that?

Presence is the matrix through which we experience all aspects of our human experience. It is fundamental to all relationships with oneself, family and friends, work-life, a sense of meaning and purpose in life and connection to community, nature and to the divine. When we are “present” our mind body and feelings are working together in alignment and we experience more peace and clarity. Without presence we don’t know that we actually exist, nor do we have access to any real information or understanding of what is happening with ourselves or anyone else. Anyone who cultivates presence in their own life and work can, with acceptance, empathy and understanding, relate to others more easily. Continue reading “I Want to Be More Present in my Life by Eileen Sendrey”

Coming Home to Yourself by Elaine Pendergrast

After chopping apples for several minutes, I scooped them into a bowl and the movement of my arms reminded me that I have a body. I stood in front of the table briefly, and let that fact sink in. I recognized that from the time I started preparing apples until then, my mind was lost in thoughts about the future, and my feelings shifted quickly from one reactive state to another.

Continue reading “Coming Home to Yourself by Elaine Pendergrast”

Nourishment for the life around us…

Every year, a tree has to show some new growth. New branches, new buds, new leaves—something new has to be there. We also need to show some yearly growth, some “income” from the expenditure of our energy. We need to have some new understanding, some new insight into the meaning and purpose of life. A tree bears fruit. We, too, need to provide nourishment for the life around us.

–from Real Health Means Harmony with Existence by Jon Schreiber www.breema.info/05142019

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Bringing Harmony into Daily Life by Luna Lacey and Elaine Pendergrast

What is Breema?

Breema is an art: the art of being present. As a practice that nurtures the wholeness of the individual, Breema has the profound effect of supporting students to experience their body, mind, and feelings working together in unity. As that experience becomes familiar, students become more available to live fully in each moment and experience the harmony that comes from that. Continue reading “Bringing Harmony into Daily Life by Luna Lacey and Elaine Pendergrast”

Your appetite for a more meaningful life.

We can nurture our feelings by doing small things—things we find rewarding while we’re doing them, without an emphasis on outer approval. If you like to draw, spend a few minutes drawing a picture. If you like to sing, sing for your own enjoyment. As your feelings are nurtured, they begin to ask you to do things which you’re genuinely interested in, like really listening to the sound of the water you’re boiling for tea. Or to really look at the birds outside your window. Once your feelings begin participating in your life, your mind starts to yearn for good food, too. Instead of automatically looking at the news and mechanically watching or reading whatever is there, it may ask you to choose something that’s of real interest to you. By nurturing your feelings, you can support your appetite for a more meaningful life.

–from Real Health Means Harmony with Existence by Jon Schreiber www.breema.info/04302019

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